A Requiem of Hope

 

“What gives you #TangibleHope in the world today? How do your values and/or belief systems come into conversation with this #TangibleHope?”

Shirin Ganji, Member of the Newmarket and Area Interfaith Council

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Verily, with hardship comes ease (Qur’an 94:5)

In my faith, I am reminded that misfortune is only a challenge of your character, and that there is rarely any difficulty that is not followed by relief. However, when faced with adversity, hope becomes questionable. It becomes the product of a constant self-struggle of whether to move forward or remain stagnant. But most of all, in any given moment it can be conjured up and it can be temporary.

However permanent or fleeting hope may be, it is, above all, empowering. In my experience, it has assisted me through moments of grief and distress.

Recently, I was on a road trip to Las Vegas, in which my purse with all my belongings including my passport, driver’s license, health card, SIN card, and credit cards were all stolen. Instantly, the desire for adventure came to an abrupt end, shrouding the night with concern and worry as I had a return flight to catch the next day. My friends accompanied me through this turn of events, and assisted me in every possible way. They inspired me to find hope in the matter and aided me in all the necessary procedures about reporting a stolen passport.

After searching all night, and slowly losing confidence in the search, they held my hands and each prayed with me for my safe return home. We each came from different backgrounds and belief systems but regardless, it ignited a beautiful expression of intent. It calmed me down, and deep in my heart everything felt like it was going to all wrap up nicely.

I retrieved a temporary passport from the Canadian embassy and managed to board a domestic flight to San Francisco, only to be faced with another road block. The airline had told me that, in order to go home, I was going to have to wait a day and cash up $2000. Out of fear of not being able to afford the trip back home I broke into tears in the middle of Union Square.

While sobbing in public, a homeless man from across the street made his way to the flower booth just outside the subway and purchased a flower. He offered me the flower and said: “Please don’t cry, everything will work out. I promise.” A man who seemed to have nothing consoled me in an attempt to spark optimism amidst a seemingly dark situation. I thanked him dearly, hopped on the train and called my booking company to get on the next plane to Toronto. Eventually, everything worked out! I got back home safely, and a month later, to my surprise, the Las Vegas airport sent me my purse with all of my belongings, as someone had returned it to the airport.

Throughout this experience, my hope was cultivated by the friends and strangers, from different identities, who supported me in my time of need. The questions of what I believe and who I believe in is left out of the equation. This is what inspires hope in me and in humanity: when we focus on the problems in front of us, and learn to lend a hand to every person who needs it.

What gives me tangible hope today is the collaboration between different faith groups and communities assisting each other in times of chaos and turmoil. Just as I was offered assistance through my journey, others require the same kind of treatment. Acknowledgement of this cause already insinuates a certain degree of awareness and how important it is to spread hope around the world.

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Shririn Ganji is the co-founder of the Undergraduate Religious Studies Student Association, geared toward historical understanding of different religions and a more practical understanding of how religion is integrated in the public sphere. She received an Honors B.A from the University of Toronto, specializing in World Religions and Philosophy. She derives most of her inspiration learning about the various religions and cultures that exist in the world, and how many of these traditions are linked, and intertwined together.

Every Tuesday, the #TangibleHope Diaries series features responses from North American grassroots peacebuilders on what gives them tangible hope in the world today. See you next week! Learn more here.

 

Heartbroken, yet Hopeful

We are heartbroken, yet we remain hopeful.  We stand ‪#‎united‬ in our collective purpose, as part of the United Religions Initiative, to promote enduring, daily interfaith cooperation, to END religiously motivated violence and to create cultures of ‪#‎peace‬, ‪#‎justice‬ and ‪#‎healing‬ for the Earth and all living beings.  ‪#‎Mogadishu‬ ‪#‎Istanbul‬ ‪#‎Dhaka‬ ‪#‎Baghdad‬ and the many other cities and communities around the world affected by violence.
We are heartbroken, yet we remain hopeful.
We stand ‪#‎united‬ in our collective purpose, as part of the United Religions Initiative, to promote enduring, daily interfaith cooperation, to END religiously motivated violence and to create cultures of ‪#‎peace‬, ‪#‎justice‬ and ‪#‎healing‬ for the Earth and all living beings.
‪#‎Mogadishu‬ ‪#‎Istanbul‬ ‪#‎Dhaka‬ ‪#‎Baghdad‬ and the many other cities and communities around the world affected by violence.

The New Face of Direct Services for Homeless Folks

Today, over 70 media organizations across the United States are shining the spotlight on homelessness in their communities. The coalition of voices speaking up are a combination of groups participating in the San Francisco Homeless Project campaign, originating in San Francisco, CA, and other organizations, located across the nation, who are following suit.

URI North America joins these voices to showcase the work our network of interfaith grassroots peacebuilders are doing to address housing insecurities within their communities. 


It’s changing the face of direct services for homeless folks. And it all started with an anonymous donor, a city that couldn’t receive anonymous money and a group of interfaith leaders committed to serving the approximately 7,000 people without homes in their city.

“What makes the difference here is hope,” said Kathy Treggiari who works with the San Francisco Navigation Center as part of her role at Episcopal Community Services of San Francisco.

The Navigation Center, which is fiscally sponsored by the San Francisco Interfaith Council, a URI North America Cooperation Circle, takes an unconventional approach to housing the homeless. Rather than a traditional shelter, the Navigation Center provides a place where entire encampments of people without homes can move together — with their partners, pets and possessions– and have 24-hours access to living quarters, a dining room, showers, bathrooms, laundry and counseling offices.

URI NA Visits the Navigation Center

The Navigation Center is cheery, with brightly-colored murals and a courtyard that soaks up the morning sun. But what makes the Navigation Center groundbreaking is its emphasis on long term housing — that is the hope that Treggiari was talking about.

The Navigation Center is supported by a host of government agencies, many of whom would generally not work together, and a dedicated staff — 45% of whom are formerly homeless themselves — to provide in-depth and personalized assistance to help residents move into permanent housing. The model has been so successful that like-minded organizations from Dallas to Seattle to cities in South Africa are looking into replicating it.

From where I sit, it’s no surprise that an interfaith organization was instrumental in such an innovative model coming into existence. Part of the beauty of interfaith work is the bringing together of people with such vastly different beliefs that the solutions they come up with and projects they are willing to take on are often new and innovative.

Learn more about these groups here:

Missoula Interfaith Collaborative

Interfaith Initiative of Santa Barbara County

Interfaith Council of Contra Costa County

Marin Interfaith Street Chaplaincy


Sari HeidenreichSari Heidenreich is the Regional Coordinator for the United Religions Initiative North America, a network of 94 interfaith organizations in the U.S. and Canada. Globally, the United Religions Initiative is the world’s largest network of grassroots interfaith peacebuilders, with 787 member groups in 95 countries all working with coalitions of people of multiple religions, spiritual expressions or Indigenous traditions to create cultures of peace, justice and healing. To find out how to get involved, click here.

What’s Love Got To Do With Dismantling Islamophobia?

What’s Love Got To Do With Dismantling Islamophobia?

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Islamophobia in the United States is not new. However, studies compiling FBI data, such as the one conducted by Georgetown’s Bridge Initiative, state that, today, U.S Muslims are five times more likely to be the victim of a hate crime than they were before 9/11 – a startling statistic, to say the least. For Rev. Will McGarvey and the Interfaith Council of Contra Costa County (ICCCC), a United Religions Cooperation Circle, the antidote to this fear and hate based sentiment is simultaneously simple and complex: love.

 In a conversation with Rev. Will McGarvey, he reminded me that more than half of Americans who say they hate Muslims have never actually met a Muslim. The Reverend and his colleagues have set out to change this statistic, by implementing a“Love Your Muslim Neighbors” program in California’s San Francisco Bay Area, where “loving” your Muslim neighbor is not passive, but rather an active commitment.

Over the course of nine “Love Your Muslim Neighbor” events held at a variety of different Christian congregations, the ICCCC has initiated and facilitated crucial discussions on some of the major misconceptions regarding Muslims, with up to 200 participants. The interreligious exchanges vary from panel discussions hosted by American Muslims of different ethnicities, religious sects, gender identities, and so on, to more intimate and informal conversations where non-Muslim community members voice curiosities they have always had but have never known how or whom to ask.

Changing the hearts and minds of people is no easy feat – but it can be done. At one of the events, a community member shared that she feared all American Muslims wanted to implement Sharia Law. However, upon engaging with her Muslim neighbors at one of these events, she realized her information sources had completely misled her.


“It took meeting a real Muslim, or a few of them, to understand that there’s an Islamophobia industry in our culture that perpetuates these lies about Muslims,” said Rev. Will McGarvey.


The “Love Your Muslim Neighbor” events are just one of the many ways URI Cooperation Circles and other interfaith peacebuilders across Canada and the United States are creatively and impactfully invoking the type of change that is most difficult to sustain: change within hearts and minds.

The list of solidarity events is heartwarmingly long and includes programming, such as the Silicon Valley Interreligious Council‘s “Hands Around the Mosque” gathering, which brought over 250 community members together to demonstrate solidarity with their Muslim neighbors, the Interfaith Center at the Presidio‘s panel discussion: Political and Religious Extremism: Creating an Effective Response, the Missoula Interfaith Collaborative‘s recent partnership with “Standing Alongside America’s Muslims” and the Sun Devils are Better Together‘s continuous “Meet a [Insert Faith Tradition]” campaign promoting interreligious relationships, among many others.

Sun Devils Are Better Together
© Sun Devils Are Better Together

Moving forward, Rev. Will McGarvey hopes to partner with other places of worship, particularly Masjids (mosques), so that relationships among community members can deepen and the program’s reach can expand.

If you are interested in hosting, collaborating with, or learning more about “Love Your Muslim Neighbor,” contact Rev. Will McGarvey with the Interfaith Council of Contra Costa County by emailing eye4cee[at]gmail.com. For more information on the program, click here and to watch a “Love Your Muslim Neighbor” panel discussion, click here.


Written by Anissa Abdel-Jelil, URI North America’s Communications and Outreach Coordinator.

Lenten service features Jewish and Muslim speakers

image-9.Bibi and Ann
Ann Eliadas from the Jewish Temple, and Bibi Bahrami from the Islamic Center have formed a wonderful friendship and have been active in the Muncie Interfaith Fellowship Cooperation Circle.

Lent is the 6 week penitential season in Christianity. This year, weekly Lenten services are being held at the Unitarian Universalist Church in Muncie, Indiana every Wednesday at noon until Easter Sunday. These services are being sponsored by Christian Ministries of Delaware County.

This past Wednesday, March 18, our guest speakers were Ann Eliadas from the Jewish Temple, and Bibi Bahrami from the Islamic Center. These two ladies have formed a wonderful friendship and have been active in the Muncie Interfaith Fellowship which is our Cooperation Circle in the United Religions Initiative.

Congratulations to Ann and Bibi for all you do to support interfaith fellowship in the City of Muncie, Indiana.

George Wolfe, Chair
Muncie Interfaith Fellowship